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Carpet Cleaning Issues - Carpet construction, upholstery cleaning, stain removal, equipment, events, etc.

which machine is best to start with

Posted by Jim (Jim), 29 July 2003
hello
can anyone help me with advice on which would be the best carpet cleaner to buy if i was going to start up cleaning carpets
any info help or advice would be much appreciated
Posted by Mike_Boxall (Mike_Boxall), 31 July 2003
Hi Jim
The decision depends on a few things including what sort of budget you have and what areas you are going to concentrate on ie residential or commercial etc. As with everything in life you get what you pay for. There are no end of machines to choose from and I would urge anyone thinking of starting up in carpet cleaning to get themselves on one of the Prochem carpet cleaning courses where, amongst other things, they will run through the different types of machines available (and not just theirs!).
Unfortunately, carpet cleaning is a relatively low cost entry business and as such there of lots of people that come and go. To compete and be successful at it you need to be able to do the job quickly and effectively and to be able to do that you need the right equipment! If you are serious about it you need to buy as good a machine as you can afford!
What sort of budget did you have in mind?
Posted by Derek (Derek), 2 August 2003
May I respectfully suggest that you contact your Trade Association and see what courses they run.

These courses should be generic therefore give you an insight into all the many various methods of cleaning carpets and soft furnishings... being a Trade Association there will be no sales pressure, just honest to goodness information which should help you decide which equipment suits your requirements
Posted by Northerclean (Northerclean), 23 August 2003
Mike, Would you suggest a course with Prochem or NCCA?

I'm in the same situation as Jim, I'm looking to become a carpet cleaner and I'm looking for as much advice as possible

Regards
Alex
Posted by Derek (Derek), 23 August 2003
Hi Guys

Both Prochem and the NCCA run superb training courses and either would certainly help you.

The main difference is that Prochem is a supply Company therefore they have a vested interest in selling their own products nevertheless these courses are some of the best.

The NCCA is a Trade Association with nothing to sell therefore they can be totally generic. What you get here is knowledge many, many years worth of it.

You pays your money and takes your choice.

I really commend the fact that you are planning on taking a course of some sort... you will learn a lot and it will certainly be money well spent

Kind regards
Derek
Posted by Northerclean (Northerclean), 24 August 2003
help for the advice Derek, give me a couple of years and I hope to have the knowledge that you have. Wink
regards
Alex
Posted by Northerclean (Northerclean), 24 August 2003
Thanks for the help and advice Derek, give me a couple of years and I hope to have the knowledge that you have.  
regards
Alex
Posted by SqueegeMan (SqueegeMan), 15 September 2003
Hi

I've been using a Rug Doctor superb value for money - would recommend it to anyone.
Posted by woodman (woodman), 15 September 2003
Not a red one is it Grin
Posted by Lionel (Lionel), 15 September 2003
Dear Jim

        I would recommend a Steemeasy 400 as this was the machine I started out with I have now bought a new Steempro powerplus, If you want to be proffesional then buy a proffesional machine, not a hire machine like a rugdoctor. Go to the NCCA show and look at machines from Ashbys and Prochem.
Posted by Mr._One_Step (Mr._One_Step), 17 September 2003
I started out with 3 Ashcombe Elite extraction units and their solvent extraction cleaning system back in late1989 and quickly became disillusioned with the products and felt that something was missing. I called the NCCA and they recommended speaking to Derek Bolton regarding their courses. The next course date was in mid 1991, eager to learn more we decided to attend the Prochem carpet-cleaning course a few months before attending the NCCA courses. Both were excellent and I recommend you attend as many courses as possible. You will benefit greatly from professional   training and information gained from networking with fellow carpet cleaners on the day.

With regard to extraction machines we quickly moved on to Ninjaís (135psi), then US Products 300psi units, Kleenrite Edge 2ís (300psi) and now CFR Pro Station 400ís (400psi) and a CFR Altra 1000psi portable. Iíve also played at length with the Bane electric TMís, Prochem, and Chemspec & Hydramaster TMís.

Itís worth noting that the industry standard for portable extractors in the states is minimum 300psi solution pump with twin vacs and a heat exchanger. The resulting clean is superior to the standard 100psi box extractors currently available in the UK. My advice would be to go for the new high performance 300psi plus extractors or the new diesel TMís.

Posted by Derek (Derek), 18 September 2003
Hi there Mr One-step
(a lot of clues in that post... speak to you later young man)

I am sure that having been to the US on numerous occassions you will have learned very quickly that around 87% of carpets in the US are tufted with either Nylon or Polypropylene pile fibres. That's why the US technicians tend to use high alkaline chemicals with high heat and of course high pressure.

There are very few woven carpets out there, although Brintons are now making inroads.

When pushing out 300 psi into a carpet make sure that you have the vacuum system to cope with the volumes of rinse solution you are using.  I know that you have 'Mr One-Step' Wink

Regards
Derek
Posted by Mr._One_Step (Mr._One_Step), 18 September 2003
Yoda, you are truly wise. I sense the force is strong within you!!!    

I was amazed at the poor quality construction of American polypropylene carpets on my first visit to the states. The carpets moved under foot and had an open pile, which resulted in severe pile flattening in the traffic areas. This type of carpet is even found in top hotels. I must say our polypropylene carpets are manufactured to a much higher standard.

It does puzzle me as to why our American cousins struggle to clean this type of carpeting and feel it necessary to mix some truly unorthodox chemical concoctions to clean with and then as you say blast it with heat and high pressure. Fortunately in the last few yearsí manufactures have looked into improving the airflow of extraction wands. With some minor modifications cfmí s are increased to provide better air flow to provide greatly reduced drying times even with the high performance portables and truckmounts.

Brintons supply a woven wool carpet tile with a flame retardant backing, which sells well to the casinos in Las Vegas. You defiantly need one for your sample library. Exceptional quality and the colours are amazing.

Posted by Derek (Derek), 19 September 2003
Hi Steve...sorry Mr One-step

Have you seen the large rug that hangs from the ceiling at Brintons.
They had a commission from a Casino in LA, I believe,  to make one for them and just to be safe they made two... the first was fine and therefore the second is hanging in the factory waiting for a buyer....just fit your lounge young man. Wink Grin

Regards
Derek (aka Yoda)
Posted by Terry_Burrows (Terry_Burrows), 19 September 2003
WinkThe machine I use is an Ashbys I think they are qiute good,there powder is very good,it does not clog up,it filters into the water very well,you do not get blobs of powder! Wink un like certain makes! Shocked
Posted by STEVE71163 (Steve Lowe), 19 September 2003
We have used various machines over the years but i always seem to go back to prochem because the build quality of their machines is excellent. I also only use prochem chemicals because of the excellent results we always get. Cheesy

Steve Lowe
Posted by Mr._One_Step (Mr._One_Step), 19 September 2003
Hi Derek,

If I use a knee kicker it should just fit side wades  Shocked and I can then fit on to the coving. I told them its supposed to go on the floor but would they listen.  Grin

Itís a pain when they need cleaning because the water falls out of the tanks. Grin Grin

Cheers

Steve

Hope you had a good day!



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